$10.95 Express Shipping Australia Wide

Hair Coloring 101 - Want to Know What the Difference Is?

Hello, my lady friends, Andrés from the hair salon Neon & Co in South Yarra , is back yet again with another blog. I hope you all thoroughly enjoyed my previous blog about blondes and got some helpful tips about maintenance using the correct hair styling products

Balayage, Baby lights, Sombré & Ombré – What’s the Difference?

These are some of the most popular terms within our hair industry, and clients are coming very familiar with these terms. I’m going to teach you what each word means so on your next visit to the hair salon; you’ll know exactly what you’re after.


Let’s start with Balayage

It’s a French word meaning ‘to sweep’. This is a coloring technique used to create the illusion of natural sun-kissed highlights on hair. Or either known as Hair Painting. This allows the colourist to create a broad range of looks, from soft natural sun-kissed glows, to the brightest, clearest blondes, dimensional brunettes to fiery redheads. The colourists at Neon & Co, have nailed this balayage technique. Each Balayage highlights are placed according to the natural fall of the client’s hair. It gives you the illusion of a natural grown out color without a solid regrowth line.. The French have been using this technique since the 1970’s and has been continually refined. The hair painting technique is painted on using a sweeping motion, to create the letter V or W on the section of hair you’re working on, and usually blended so the softness at the start of the balayage is not so harsh I learned this Balayage technique when I started my apprenticeship, almost seven years ago.

It’s an art doing Balayage, and I’ve defiantly felt like every time I get the chance to introduce and use this technique on my clients, I get better and better. So if you’re a Foiled highlighted blonde with about 8-10 weeks of regrowth, and hate the upkeep of the color, ask your colourists to do Balayage highlights This means, your experienced colourist can do the Balayage technique and bring it up the roots and soften your regrowth with highlights, a great way to transition to Balayage highlights.


Baby lights, such a cute name!

Don’t you reckon? The name speaks for itself, ultra beautiful baby highlights. I use this highlighting technique to create lightness around the hairline and parting, and I usually intermix this technique when I’m doing Blondes, Sombrés, etc. Now you all are probably thinking, what’s Sombré… Hold up; that part is coming up next. Back to Baby lights, these are super soft highlights that delicately soften the roots of the solid colored hair. These subtle highlights are perfect for women wanting a beautiful effect without looking like they ever went to the salon in the first place. This technique works best on very fine hair to give you a more multidimensional, radiant, natural looking head of highlights. It mimics the natural highlights of a child. It gives that illusion and effect on the hair and the shade of blonde (hoping you read my previous blog) can be tailored to the client based on their skin tone and eye color.


Sombré, a lived in low-fuss color

Perfect for customers not wanting to commit to getting a color every 6-8 weeks. Sombré is a mix of colors, multidimensional. It mimics the naturalness of sunkissed bleached hair. The Balayage technique is used to create the Sombré look Colourists tailor this look to each client, all depending on the clients, skin tone and eye color. Beautiful for first timers of color, super subtle. I like to intermix my Baby lights technique with my Sombré looks to create soft lightness around the hairline and parting. Regarding touching up your low-fuss color, every seven weeks for a glaze to give the hair life, shine, and tone. But generally, you can go months without touching it up again as it’s such a low-fuss lived in color. It doesn’t grow out with a solid regrowth line. You will love it. Trust me. This is probably the most popular one out of the bunch, even though it’s been around for years clients who are busy from day to day with work/family etc. can wash and wear this beautiful soft Sombré color without worrying about touch-ups!

Now lucky last – Ombré | Sister color to Sombré

Just more intense. It’s either known as the dip dye color, two tones, top deck haha. The word ombré originates from France, meaning Shaded. It’s a two toned color, making a huge statement for whoever wears this ongoing trend. The roots transitioning into the mid strands are not touched with color, from mids into end strands every single bit of hair is colored. You can be any shade of blonde with this color or a fashion pastel color. Bright lavenders, Pink, Plum purples you get the point. It’s usually achieved using the Balayage technique and is also ideal for clients with a busy day to day life.

Just more intense. It’s either known as the dip dye color, two tones, top deck haha. The word ombré originates from France, meaning Shaded. It’s a two toned color, making a huge statement for whoever wears this ongoing trend. The roots transitioning into the mid strands are not touched with color, from mids into end strands every single bit of hair is colored. You can be any shade of blonde with this color or a fashion pastel color. Bright lavenders, Pink, Plum purples you get the point. It’s usually achieved using the Balayage technique and is also ideal for clients with a busy day to day life.

Now that’s a wrap, hope you’ve all enjoyed reading this and learned something about what these terms mean. If there’s a particular subject that you all would love to know about, please drop an email, and I can talk about that in my next article!